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August 03 2018

moneymetals

Trump’s Fed Feud; Indexing Capital Gains Taxes to Inflation?

Well now, without further delay, let’s get right to this week’s exclusive interview.

Samuel pelaez

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Samuel Pelaez, CIO and Portfolio Manager at Galileo Global Equity Advisors, a Canadian subsidiary of U.S. Global Investors. Sam manages Galileo's Growth and Income fund as well as the Technology and Blockchain fund and also follows the natural resource and gold mining space quite closely. And it's a real pleasure to have him on with us today.

Sam, thanks so much for the time and welcome.

Samuel Pelaez: Thanks, Mike. It's a great pleasure to join you. I think this is the first time.

Mike Gleason: Yeah, absolutely. Excited to get a chance to talk to you finally. You've been talking about commodities being way undervalued. You published a chart back in the spring showing the value of the S&P GSCI Index of commodities companies relative to the broader S&P 500 Index. The ratio is near all-time lows. Since that chart was published in April not a great deal has changed, so talk about where we're at here in commodities now and give us your thoughts on what the value proposition looks like today because they certainly have been laggards compared to the broader markets.

Samuel Pelaez: Yeah, absolutely. That's my favorite all-time chart I think. I'm a big proponent of commodities and natural resource investing. Keep in mind, that chart goes over 60 years or so of markets. We've had cycles like this three times or this will be the third time. Twice in the past we’ve seen that sort of extreme rating where commodities are so undervalued relative to the broader market as measured by the S&P 500.

What that suggests is that we may be at a juncture here that provides an opportunity to invest in resources that we haven't had for over 20 years. Last time this happened was coincidental with the NASDAQ 1990-2000 boom. That was the time when the commodities were as undervalued relative to the broader market. And what happened since was obviously the big industrialization of China commodities did very well for a decade up until 2008 and even a little bit further than that.


Check out the full podcast here.: 
https://www.moneymetals.com/podcasts/2018/08/03/bull-market-natural-resources-001588

August 01 2018

moneymetals

Top Gold Miners Production Declined 15% While Costs Escalate

Even though the gold price increased in 2018, the top gold miners production declined while costs continue to escalate. Output at three of the top gold miners in the world fell in the first half of 2018 compared to the same period last year. With rising costs due to higher energy prices, on top of decreasing production, the top gold miners free cash flow declined precipitously in 2018.

While many analysts focus on the company’s profits or net income, I like to pay attention to its free cash flow. Free cash flow is nothing more than subtracting capital expenditures from the company’s cash from operations. Because the gold mining industry is very capital intensive, the company’s free cash flow is a better indicator of financial health rather than the net income.

As mentioned, all of the top three gold miners suffered production declines in the first half (1H) of 2018 versus the same period last year. The biggest loser was Barrick, whose production declined over 20% by falling to 2.1 million oz in 1H 2018 compared to 2.7 Moz in the previous year. Goldcorp’s production fell 10%, while Newmont’s output dropped by nearly 9%:

Top miners gold production 1h 2017 vs 1h 2018

Altogether, the top three gold mining companies’ production fell 15% or approximately 1 Moz in the first six months of 2018 versus last year. Even though Goldcorp isn’t the third largest gold miner in the world, the company has already posted its second-quarter results. AngloGold is the third largest gold miner, but it won’t publish its financial statements until August 20th. Also, Kinross is likely ranked number four ahead of Goldcorp, but the company posts its production figures in “gold equivalent ounces.” If a company has to publish its gold or silver production in “equivalent ounces,” then the analysis is a bit flawed in my opinion.

Regardless, these top three gold miners all experienced declines in production which impacted their financial balance sheets. To get a better idea of the true cost of production and the health of the gold mining industry, I have come up with an “Adjusted Earnings Breakeven” price as well as a “Free Cash Flow” breakeven price.

July 31 2018

moneymetals

GOP Congressman Investigates Undisclosed Gold Market Intervention by China and the Exchange Stabilization Fund


Rep. Alex Mooney (R-WV) Calls Out Fed & Treasury for Dodging Questions on Gold Activities

Washington, DC (July 31, 2018) – A member of the U.S. House Financial Services Committee is calling out the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury for dodging questions about their activities involving America’s gold reserves.

In a letter dated July 27, Representative Alex Mooney (R-WV) wrote to Jerome Powell, Chairman of the Federal Reserve, and Steven Mnuchin, Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, after receiving perfunctory responses to his April 24th letter, noting “a few questions were either not addressed at all or not fully addressed.”

In particular, the Fed and Treasury would not articulate any U.S. policy toward gold and refused to comment on historical U.S. State Department documents pointing to a U.S. policy of “driving gold out of the world financial system in favor of the Federal Reserve Note or Special Drawing Rights issued by the International Monetary Fund.”

In his follow-up letter, Rep. Mooney provided evidence of involvement by the Exchange Stabilization Fund in the gold market and called attention to “the recent correlation of the gold price with the price of the Chinese yuan and the valuation of the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights.”

Check out the full press release


July 30 2018

moneymetals

July 27 2018

moneymetals

Ed Steer: When JP Morgan Decides to Stop Shorting Silver, Prices Will Shock You

Well now, without further delay, let’s get right to this week’s exclusive interview.

Ed steer

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Ed Steer of Ed Steer's Gold and Silver Digest. Ed has covered the precious metals markets for going on two decades now, having written for Casey Research prior to his latest project, and is also a director at GATA, the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee, where he and his colleagues work to expose the manipulation in the gold and silver markets.

Ed, it's a pleasure to have you back on, and thanks for the time today.

Ed Steer: And thanks for having me on.

Mike Gleason: Well, Ed, let's start off by getting your assessment on the gold and silver markets here. Prices fell below some key technical support levels recently but have found some support and have rallied slightly in the past few days, and I should note we're talking here during after-hours trading on Wednesday. But these are trying times for metals investors, Ed, so what are you expecting from the markets in the months ahead?

Ed Steer: Well, there's no question these are trying time, especially this last take down since the middle of June. Everybody knows that the precious metals have been basically in the dumpster for the last five or six or eight or ten years, and this final kick in the pants, the down side, has just demoralized everyone.

What I think it is, in the technical support lines or whatever they are, is based on technical analysis, and what's going on basically is what Ted Butler has pointed out, is that this is JP Morgan and the commercial traders taking the managed money traders on another financial ride for fun profit and price management purposes.

When this is pretty much done to the down side, and it appears that we're done now, Mike, it really looks like the low is in or if not very close to it. Once that is done there is nothing left but blue sky and hopefully that JP Morgan Chase, which has been the big short seller of last resort, they don't step into the next rally and we’re going to be away to the races in pretty short order.

Mike Gleason: We aren't too sure why speculators are still willing to enter the gold and silver futures markets given the evidence that they are likely to be cheated. We know that bullion banks, like JP Morgan, have a nice set of tools for fleecing clients and controlling prices, chat rooms for coordinating attacks, high frequency trading set-ups designed to front run trades, the ability to sell essentially unlimited quantities of paper silver to sop up any amount of demand. What we don't see is serious effort to provide honest alternatives. It seems like there would be good demand for an exchange that does a better job of guaranteeing fair treatment. Miners, who are harmed the most by any price suppression that may exist, have legitimate hedging needs and it seems like they would be thrilled to have an alternative, but we aren't aware of any serious movement towards creating something better. Are you and why have we been stuck with such a flawed and fraudulent system of price discovery for the metals for so long?

Check out the full podcast here.
moneymetals

Ed Steer: When JP Morgan Decides to Stop Shorting Silver, Prices Will Shock You

Well now, without further delay, let’s get right to this week’s exclusive interview.

Ed steer

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Ed Steer of Ed Steer's Gold and Silver Digest. Ed has covered the precious metals markets for going on two decades now, having written for Casey Research prior to his latest project, and is also a director at GATA, the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee, where he and his colleagues work to expose the manipulation in the gold and silver markets.

Ed, it's a pleasure to have you back on, and thanks for the time today.

Ed Steer: And thanks for having me on.

Mike Gleason: Well, Ed, let's start off by getting your assessment on the gold and silver markets here. Prices fell below some key technical support levels recently but have found some support and have rallied slightly in the past few days, and I should note we're talking here during after-hours trading on Wednesday. But these are trying times for metals investors, Ed, so what are you expecting from the markets in the months ahead?

Ed Steer: Well, there's no question these are trying time, especially this last take down since the middle of June. Everybody knows that the precious metals have been basically in the dumpster for the last five or six or eight or ten years, and this final kick in the pants, the down side, has just demoralized everyone.

What I think it is, in the technical support lines or whatever they are, is based on technical analysis, and what's going on basically is what Ted Butler has pointed out, is that this is JP Morgan and the commercial traders taking the managed money traders on another financial ride for fun profit and price management purposes.

When this is pretty much done to the down side, and it appears that we're done now, Mike, it really looks like the low is in or if not very close to it. Once that is done there is nothing left but blue sky and hopefully that JP Morgan Chase, which has been the big short seller of last resort, they don't step into the next rally and we’re going to be away to the races in pretty short order.

Mike Gleason: We aren't too sure why speculators are still willing to enter the gold and silver futures markets given the evidence that they are likely to be cheated. We know that bullion banks, like JP Morgan, have a nice set of tools for fleecing clients and controlling prices, chat rooms for coordinating attacks, high frequency trading set-ups designed to front run trades, the ability to sell essentially unlimited quantities of paper silver to sop up any amount of demand. What we don't see is serious effort to provide honest alternatives. It seems like there would be good demand for an exchange that does a better job of guaranteeing fair treatment. Miners, who are harmed the most by any price suppression that may exist, have legitimate hedging needs and it seems like they would be thrilled to have an alternative, but we aren't aware of any serious movement towards creating something better. Are you and why have we been stuck with such a flawed and fraudulent system of price discovery for the metals for so long?

Check out the full podcast here.

July 26 2018

moneymetals

Silver Threads among the Gold: What the Tea Leaves Seem to Be Telling Us

The ongoing July silver (and gold) slam has a 2008 feel about it. Important data point elements are different, but there's an air of panic on the part of physical precious metals' owners.

"Major trend lines" being broken to the downside; physical metals' buying (in the U.S. off significantly so far on the year; (some) long-term silver holders giving up the ghost and selling their metal below spot.

About the only thing we have yet to see – on a large scale – is "paper metal" being offered at a price well below what a customer would actually pay for the physical.

In late 2008, while silver was being quoted in the markets at $9.50/ounce, you simply could not find it in "real life" for much less than $12 the ounce.

How Might George Soros Approach This Situation?

In a recent interview for The New York Times Magazine, George Soros talked about his years' running the very successful Quantum Fund – which yielded investors an almost unheard of 40% annual rate of return.

He spoke of his "theory of reflexivity" – the idea that "peoples' biases and perceptions can move prices in directions that don't accord with the underlying reality."

He would "nibble" on an idea until investors' emotions became increasingly disconnected from what was really taking place – or what was almost certainly slated to be – once more balanced circumstances had come to pass. Then he would substantially add to his position.

Soros didn't always get it right, but when he did, he made a killing. His most famous bet was shorting the British pound... against the Bank of England.

Soros claimed his strength as an investor was in recognizing and acting on what he referred to as “far from equilibrium” moments.

SGE silver delivery volume chart

Shanghai International Gold Exchange silver volume continues to rise sharply.

A Technical Take

As for near-term action, Hidden Pivot maven, Rick Ackerman wrote recently in his Rick's Picks column, that silver has the potential to make a large move either up or down, depending upon what the price does on the hourly and monthly charts.



moneymetals

The Swamp vs. Alternative Currencies

In Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell’s testimony before Congress last week, he reiterated his intent to continue the central bank’s gradual rate-hiking campaign.

Among those who are "not thrilled" about the prospect of higher interest rates: the President of the United States.

Trump Tweeted:

"....The United States should not be penalized because we are doing so well. Tightening now hurts all that we have done. The U.S. should be allowed to recapture what was lost due to illegal currency manipulation and BAD Trade Deals. Debt coming due & we are raising rates - Really?"

Trump seems surprised that the Fed careerist he promoted to be chairman isn’t embracing Trump’s economic priorities. But nobody drawn from the fiat money swamp should be expected to act contrary to what’s in the institutional interests of the central bank – and the banking elite more broadly.

Swamp creature Powell couldn’t even bring himself to express support for Trump’s pro-growth tax and regulatory reforms during last week’s testimony. He nervously evaded a simple question from a Republican Congressman about whether tax cuts and deregulation have boosted business confidence. Even when pressed, he wouldn’t answer it.

Powell apparently didn’t want to say something that might offend Democrats. The Fed is “independent,” after all, and non-partisan. It has to keep up appearances before Congress.

But when it came to the question of cryptocurrencies, the government’s top banker felt free to go on at length about why he doesn’t like them.


​Continue reading here.​

July 24 2018

moneymetals

THE INDIAN INVESTOR: The Major Wild Card In The Silver Market

There’s a sleeping tiger in the silver market, and it isn’t the Chinese. While the Chinese continue to acquire a lot of gold, they aren’t that interested in silver However; it’s the Indian investor who is has been the dominant player in the silver market. Why?

According to an article published last year on LiveMint.com, “Silver is so ingrained in Indian tradition that the country’s currency, the rupee, is named after ‘Rup,’ the Sanskrit word for silver.” How interesting. I have been doing research in the silver market for over a decade, and I just found out from this article that India’s currency, the Rupee, is named after silver. It just goes to show, we learn something new every day.

Thus, it makes perfect sense that the Indians are the major player in the silver market as their silver imports have accounted for a significant portion of annual global mine supply. In a recent article by Louis at Smaulgld.com, he provided the following charts on Indians monthly and annual silver imports:

Indian silver imports 2017-2018

(Indian Monthly Silver Imports)

Indian silver imports 1999-2018

(Indian Annual Silver Imports)

As we can see, India imported a record 902 metric tons of silver in April since last year. Furthermore, as Louis states in his article quoted above:

Indian silver imports through April 2018 were 2,889 or an average of 722.5 tons. If this average holds throughout the year, India would import 8,667 tons of silver in 2018.

If India continues to import the same amount of silver as it has over the past four months for the remainder of the year, it will reach nearly 8,700 metric tons (mt) and surpass its previous record set in 2015 at 8,529 mt. Now, if India did import 8,700 mt of silver this year, it would account for 32% of total world mine supply.

Continue reading....

July 23 2018

moneymetals

Gold & Silver Need THIS to Unfold before They Rally Sharply Higher...

Well now, for more on the unfolding trade war, the selloff in commodities and gold, and much more, let’s get right to this week’s exclusive interview.

Greg weldon

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Greg Weldon, CEO and president of Weldon Financial. Greg has over three decades of market research and trading experience, specializing in the metals and commodity markets, and his close connection with the metals led him to author a book back in 2006, titled Gold Trading Boot Camp, where he accurately predicted the implosion of the U.S. credit market and urged people to buy gold when it was only $550 an ounce.

He's a regular presenter at financial conferences throughout the country, and is a highly sought-after guest on many financial shows. And it's always great to have him on the Money Metals Podcast. Greg, good to talk to you again. Welcome back.

Greg Weldon: Thanks, Mike. My pleasure.

Mike Gleason: Well, Greg, we've been keeping a close eye on the dollar, as I know you have been as well. For metals investors, the rally in the dollar is providing some serious headwinds. When we last spoke in early May, the rally had begun. You weren't surprised, and thought it might run up to the vicinity of 96 on the DXY Index, and that's looking like a very good call. We're just a bit over 95 currently. But you thought the rally could fizzle out, and the dollar could be back on the slide somewhere in the second half of the year. So, what are your thoughts currently? Has anything changed your outlook for the greenback, Greg?

Greg Weldon: Yeah. I think the odds of the dollar continuing higher have expanded here, and I think it's a function of the Fed. I think we got information in the last week or so that is, frankly, pertinent, because if you kind of trace back to what we were talking about in May, we started to see signs of stagflation. We started to see signs of stress in the second derivatives of where the growth had been. A place like Germany, an export juggernaut. When you start to see some issues in places like the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, they provide semi-finished goods to Germany that finishes them and exports them. So, we had already kind of seen some cracks in the global macro dynamic globally.

And the question then was, "well, if inflation's going higher, will the Fed follow inflation even at the risk of potentially bringing the hammer down on the backend on the consumer who is extremely leveraged here, unprecedented borrowing.” Same thing as 2006 and 2007. You're borrowing against unrealized paper profits. In that case it was mortgages, in your home, the value, all right?

In this cases it's the stock market. Like the case in 2006 and '07, home prices will never go down, right? Well, we learned that's not true. And then the case here it seems like stock prices will never go down, right? Passive investment, just pile in, and you'll be rich, and here's the American dream in a nutshell, no problem. Well, we can call into question that, of course, and if the stock market declines and consumers are on the hook, you're going to be facing a very similar situation where the consumer's kind of upside down.

Having said all of that, the question really puts the focus on the Fed, and what the Fed just told us in their monetary report, which is the basis for which Chairman Powell is using as his testimony here on Capitol Hill, The Humphrey-Hawkins semiannual report to Congress. The Fed was very specific. I was really surprised at the language in this report. It's 71 pages. I went to every single page. It took me six hours yesterday doing this, but it was really worth it because the Fed say in this report, not only do we want to get to a level where we're at the neutral rate, the kind of natural rate, the neutral rate of Fed policy which we've been saying all along. They want to get to neutral, which is somewhere between two and two and a half based on where inflation is.

Well, the Fed just told us, "We don't want to just get to neutral, we want to get a slight bit above neutral, i.e. we actually want to get tight here." All right? And if inflation's moving higher and the Fed wants to get tight, meaning above the rate of inflation, they're behind the curve and they're going to have to move more quickly and this was kind of the tone of this monetary report.

And the sense was, they're admitting, "Hey! Inflation is now above our target for the first time, that doesn't mean we're slowing down.” So this is bothering commodity markets because it's lifting the dollar. The Fed is presumably going to be tighter, it's going to chase inflation, doesn't care about what the back end economic dynamic might be and that you throw in the trade dynamic, which is having a huge impact, i.e. look at the declining commodities. Look at the decline in China. Look at the decline in Canada in terms of some of the economic numbers, let alone the markets. Look at the pressure on emerging market currencies.

The other thing the Fed said in this report was the external risk is primarily seen in Argentina, Turkey, China, and emerging Asia. We run spreadsheets here where I have my own proprietary algorithms that I wrote back in the 1980's. I'm a math geek by heart, by history and we have algorithms that we use to track the ETF's out there, all of them. Well, I ran a full scan yesterday and the top 25 trends right now in the ETF world, including international ETFs, commodity ETFs, fixed income ETFs, all the sector ETFs in the U.S., 25 top trends, 24 were bearish and it was spread out among metals, commodities, China, and emerging Asia. All the things the Fed just cited as their risk factors.

So, my question then becomes, again, does the Fed pay attention? Is the Fed doing their normal puppeteering here where they're trying to be vocally tighter so they can use words to kind of ease some without actually having to totally shift policy and start cutting rates? I don't know, but I think right now, whereas maybe we might think that the dollar would soften when the Fed rhetoric softened, that's not happening because the Fed rhetoric is not softening. In fact, it's getting harder and this is becoming a problem. You see it in emerging markets, you see it in commodities, and you certainly see it in gold and silver.

You can read or listen to the entire podcast here

July 19 2018

moneymetals

How to "Measure" Your Precious Metals Holdings

Now that the "summer doldrums" for the metals and miners seem to be upon us – which may or may not last until after Labor Day – it might be worth your time to "measure" your precious metals' holdings.

Let's start by taking a look at the terms and (simplified) definitions for foreign and domestically-listed mineral resource-sector companies that are listed on a Canadian stock exchange.

Called the National Instrument (NI) 43-101, this reporting review was put together in an effort to protect investors, after a "fake mining story" of truly epic proportions erupted in the late 1990's...

Time: gold's fools magazine

It was the infamous Bre-X scandal, in which a Filipino geologist, Michael de Guzman, operating as a property project manager in Borneo, began "salting" ore samples with gold flecks shaved from his wedding ring.

As word got out about the "big find," the price of the company, Bre-X Minerals Ltd. rose from $0.30 cents a share, to an eventual open market high of over $250!

To keep the scam going, he bought panned gold from the locals, so that when examined, the new ore samples would show "color."

Before long, some of the largest mining companies and investment houses in the business – and even the Indonesian government – were touting the story and trying to get a piece of the action.

Independent auditors sent in to look at samples noted that the gold had rounded edges (which you might expect to find with stream-deposited placer gold), but Guzman simply made up excuses – which at first, everyone accepted. In late 1996, Lehman Brothers issued a "strong buy," calling it "the gold discovery of the century."




July 17 2018

moneymetals

Gold & Silver Investors’ 8 Commandments for Avoiding Rip Offs

For every promising investment opportunity you come across, there are multiple opportunities for bad-faith brokers and hucksters to try to rip you off.

It could be undisclosed commissions and fees in an annuity, unwanted accounts opened up by a banker seeking additional fees, trades sabotaged by market manipulators, or any number of other schemes.

Rip-off artists, unfortunately, operate within the precious metals space as well.

Most recently, a scammer posing as a government agent in order to gain people’s trust was convicted of selling counterfeit gold bars and phony Morgan silver dollars. He took one investor for $11,000, according to reports.

You can avoid this type of scam as well as other common cheats when buying or selling precious by heeding the following guidelines.

1. Avoid “Too Good to Be True” Deals

If a price on a bullion product sounds too good to be true – or comes with exorbitant incentives or exaggerated claims – you should be suspicious.

Too good to be true!

Gold and silver bullion products do not legitimately sell below spot prices. Individuals holding precious metals can visit a dealer and sell items immediately, for full value. Given that everyone has this option, it is highly likely anyone offering items well below actual value is trying to stick it to you.

Legitimate dealers cannot afford to offer items way below cost either. Dealers must charge small premiums above spot prices to reflect product minting costs and the costs of doing business. (One notable exception: 90% silver U.S. coins minted prior to 1965 (aka “junk” silver) which exhibit significant wear occasionally become available at melt value or even slightly lower.)


Check out the other commandments.. (https://goo.gl/Zb8zg4)

July 16 2018

moneymetals

Bitcoin Holders Are Today Learning Something Goldbugs Already Know

Precious metals investors have learned a difficult truth in recent years. The best way to control a market is to put Wall Street in charge of it.

Gold and silver futures were created in the 1970s with the admitted purpose of “increasing volatility” in the markets and discouraging the ownership of physical bullion. It is a lesson that participants in other markets would do well to learn – specifically the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets.

Officials were terrified that free markets built around the supply and demand for tangible (not paper) gold and silver would wind up destroying confidence in the fiat dollar.

President Richard Nixon defaulted on the Bretton Woods agreement with other nations to redeem dollars for gold in 1971.

The confidence in the dollar would evaporate if the dollar price of gold spiraled higher.

The COMEX launched trading in gold and silver futures in the early 1970s. The gambit nearly failed by the end of that decade as the gold and silver priced in dollars began rising exponentially. But the Wall Street insiders behind the COMEX, with the support of federal regulators, managed to regain control.

They were able to pin the blame for price increases on the Hunt Brothers’ attempt to “corner the market” rather than on failing confidence in the dollar and the rapid price inflation going on at the time.

Through their control of the exchange, COMEX officials used a one-sided tool and stopped accepting buy orders in silver futures, only allowing orders to sell. What happened to the price in a “market” which allowed zero buyers was predictable.

The central planners at the Fed also stepped in. Chairman Paul Volcker raised interest rates dramatically, helping stem the tide of people dumping dollars and taking the shine off of gold. 

Continue reading...

July 10 2018

moneymetals

How NOT to Become a Casualty in the War on Cash

Lots of bullion investors wonder if the metal they hold might one day be needed for barter and trade. They bought gold and silver, at least in part, as a form of insurance. It just might come in handy in an extreme circumstance such as a currency crisis of the sort Venezuelans are grappling with right now.

However, a hyper-inflationary collapse in the dollar isn’t the only dire scenario to insure against.

War on cash

It is now clear that the dollar, and the financial network it runs on, is a mechanism for controlling people who don’t toe the government line.

That fact may be a greater reason for alarm than the prospect of a dollar collapse. But it gets far less consideration.

Wall Street banks and government regulators have teamed up against your liberty and your privacy.

Officials would like to track 100% of what you do with your money, and the banks would like to charge a fee on 100% of those transactions. Those motivations are at the root of the today’s war on cash – the push to eliminate paper cash and replace it with electronic transactions.

The Bank Secrecy Act will soon turn 20 years old. Banks have filed millions of secret Suspicious Activity Reports on transactions involving cash. And Americans performing a transaction involving more than $10,000 in cash may have an IRS Form 8300 documenting their transaction filed with the federal government.

Americans trying to transact privately with cash are being watched, and they have no idea how closely.

​Continue reading: ​
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2018/07/09/not-become-a-casualty-in-war-on-cash-001571

July 05 2018

moneymetals

Trump’s Trade Wars Could Spark Global Flight to Gold

President Donald Trump’s “America First” trade policies are upending decades of global arrangements and entanglements. Globalists are aghast that the leader of the free world is openly confrontational toward NAFTA, NATO, the European Union, United Nations, and World Trade Organization.

In rebuffing the global community by pursuing unilateral tariffs and vowing to win trade wars against both rivals and putative allies alike, Trump is playing a high stakes game. Trump’s trade wars could test the U.S. dollar’s status as world reserve currency.

According to economist Brad Schiller, “Nations are willing to accept U.S. dollars in exchange for their goods because they trust that the dollar will retain its value… The long history of U.S. dollar stability gives the U.S. this unique trade advantage — a key reason we can import more goods than we export year after year.”

Schiller, like many conventionally trained economists, seems to believe that our ever-growing trade deficit benefits us. In the near term, we do get to consume more things. But countries that are sending us stuff in exchange for our dollars are effectively accumulating claims on our future.

China holds title to an enormous hoard of U.S. dollar IOUs. U.S. taxpayers now owe China more than $1.2 trillion. China ran a $366 billion trade surplus in 2017 alone.

President Trump has moved to impose tens of billions of dollars in tariffs on China and other trading partners including Canada, Mexico, and the European Union. They have responded with retaliatory tariffs affecting everything from wheat crops to Harley-Davidsons.

United states tariffs

Winning trade wars may not be as easy as Trump had thought.

Dying U.S. Senator John McCain, a longtime Trump detractor and globalist, is among those who are actively rooting against the U.S. administration and consoling foreign countries.

“To our allies: bipartisan majorities of Americans remain pro-free trade, pro-globalization & supportive of alliances based on 70 years of shared values. Americans stand with you, even if our president doesn’t,” McCain ranted on Twitter.

It's not clear the failed former presidential candidate speaks for “bipartisan majorities of Americans” as he boasts. Nor is it clear that these foreign alliances reflect our “shared values.”





June 29 2018

moneymetals

Frank Holmes: Tariff War Akin to Raising Taxes, Recession Looms

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Frank Holmes, CEO and Chief Investment Officer at U.S. Global Investors. Mr. Holmes has received various honors over the years, including being named America's Best Fund Manager for 2016 by the Mining Journal. He is also the co-author of the book, The Goldwatcher: Demystifying Gold Investing and is a regular guest on CNBC, Bloomberg, Fox Business, as well as right here on the Money Metals podcast.

Frank, welcome back and thanks for joining us again. How are you today?

Frank Holmes: I'm great, and it's great to be chatting with you about this languishing gold market.

Mike Gleason: Yeah, we certainly have a lot to talk about. Never a dull moment here in these markets. To start out here, Frank, when we had you on back in March, we talked about the steel and aluminum tariffs Trump imposed. Things have escalated since then. The president is talking about tariffs on European automobiles and another $2 billion on imports from China. We're very curious about what impact this trade policy might have on the dollar and, by extension, precious metal. So far, at least, the dollar has been strengthening, but we aren't sure how seriously the markets are taking the possibility of a trade war becoming a currency war. If that happens, the U.S. certainly seems vulnerable. We have by far the most to lose given the dollar's status as a global reserve currency. What do you make of the recent strength in the dollar, and where do you think things may be headed if we wind up in a full-blown trade war?

Frank Holmes: Well, first, what I'd like to say is I wrote a piece said, "President Trump, you can't suck and blow a balloon at the same time." It was a just amazing feat to get corporate taxes down, and that was really the catalyst that launched the stock market, that fulfilled and provided visibility for the next several years of robust economic growth. When I talk to all the macroeconomists, all the macro analysts who are pointing out that immediately Walmart increased salaries as a consumer company, and a manufacturing company started spending more money on factory upgrades. 10 years since they've really spent a lot of money on durable goods. And that was really important for the metals as a whole.

But with this whole tariff war, well, that's basically raising taxes. Tariffs are always an indirect tax on an industry or sector of the economy, and it's defeating. And this week, the Fed chair was saying that, Powell, that he's getting feedback that exports are starting to be canceled because of the tariff battle right now. So I think the combination of the stronger dollar along with the tariff battle is only going to set us up for a recession faster than we thought, unless he can tune back what he's been talking about.

But I think to understand capital markets, the flows of funds, that historically when the two-year government bond, which is the bond that relates to all the short-term currency fluctuations, they compare 90 days and two-year government yields to the inflationary rate of their country, and then they look at all the countries and compare them to net positive return. And right now, the U.S. dollar is strong because the two-year government bond is above the dividend yield of the S&P 500. Well, as soon as that happened, immediately, pension fund institutions stopped buying stocks because they can turn around and get a guaranteed yield for the next two years with no risk on a dividend yield that's higher than what the S&P's forecasted to deliver in the future of two years and giving now.

So that creates this VIX explosion. And then we have this sort of fear that rates are going to continue to rise with the CPI number because inflation is rising, and that's put a dent in the price of gold and made the dollar strong. But a strong dollar at this stage, along with tariffs, is the worst thing for economic growth and prosperity. And Trump's ego is big enough and rational that he wants growth and he wants economic growth, so I think we're going to see in the second half, we've had a peak in rates, and we'll see rates come off. And I think then you'll see this move in the price of gold.

Mike Gleason: Setting aside any ramifications for the dollar, do you think the U.S. can win a trade war? I mean, the president certainly seems confident. On the one hand, we agree with an observation you made when we spoke last, China has stolen a lot of intellectual property, and it would be nice if we could do something about that. But on the other hand, tariffs are bound to raise prices for Americans. It's a tax, like you said, and there are plenty of examples of trade restrictions and that sort of central planning leading to all sorts of unintended consequences. So how do you rate the president's chances for success here, Frank?

​Read/Listen to the entire article here. ​


June 26 2018

moneymetals

U.S. Gold Exports to London Surge

As U.S. gold exports to Hong Kong and China fell 25% in the first four months of the year, London picked up the slack. According to the USGS, U.S. gold exports to London surged more than doubled from January to April, compared to the same period last year. Interestingly, the amount of gold exported to London during this period nearly equaled the total U.S. domestic gold mine supply.

From the data reported in the USGS Gold Mineral Industry Survey’s, U.S. gold exports to the U.K. (London) jumped to 64.3 metric tons (mt) Jan-Apr, versus 25.5 mt during the first four months last year:

Total u.s. gold exports to the u.k.

Here is the breakdown of U.S. gold exports to London for each month:

Jan = 12.2 mt

Feb = 12.1 mt

Mar = 21.2 mt

Apr = 18.8 mt

Total 64.3 mt

As I have mentioned, a lot London’s gold is exported to China and Switzerland. And then, the majority of Switzerland’s gold is exported to Hong Kong and China. For example, according to the statistics on GoldChartsrus, in March, the U.K. exported 16 mt of gold to China and 32 mt of gold to Switzerland. In the very same month, Switzerland exported 80 mt of gold to Hong Kong and China. So, most of the west’s gold still ends up in Hong Kong and China.




Continue reading the article 

June 25 2018

moneymetals

A Bargain Hunter’s Delight

Falling prices and low premiums did prompt strong retail buying in the markets for physical bullion in the past week.

The market is presenting the best opportunity to buy popular products in a very long time. Spot prices are the lowest they have been since December, but premiums are the lowest they have EVER been in more than a decade.

Consider pre-1965 90% silver coins, for example.

Silver bottomed under $14/oz in 2015, but premiums on silver dimesquarters, and half dollars were north of $5/oz at the time. Investors had to spend close to $19/oz to buy those coins. Today they can be purchased for well under $17/oz – only a few cents over spot for larger orders.

Silver Eagle premiums are at generational lows as well. Random year Silver Eagles are selling for as low as $2.05 over spot, for example​.


Article source: ​
https://goo.gl/tVsnUZ

moneymetals

Sound Money Needed Now More Than Ever

The sound money movement reemerged on the national political scene a decade ago. In 2008, the financial crisis brought in a fresh wave of U.S. gold and silver investors.

Ron Paul and the Tea Party advocated for limiting government and ending the Federal Reserve system. Sound money advocates made real inroads in recruiting Americans to their cause based on evidence that the nation is headed for bankruptcy.

The implications of the most recent financial crisis went way beyond budget and finance.

Many Americans grasped the more significant lesson. The perpetual expansion of government spending lay behind the corresponding decline in personal liberty for them, their children, and their children’s children.

National debt 1940 - 2008

Dishonest money is a dream for politicians and bankers, but it is a nightmare for citizens. Charts showing the final abandonment of the remnants of the gold standard in 1971 and the exponential rise in government debt helped people make the connection between dishonest, unlimited fiat money and unlimited government.

Here is one example from the Daily Caller...

The trend shown on this chart has not changed or improved. The red bar on the right hand side of the current chart now stands more than twice as high with total government debt north of $21 trillion.

There is no credible effort in Washington to limit spending. It is safe to say U.S. deficits and the corresponding borrowing will continue to rise exponentially. It will continue until confidence finally collapses; either in the nation’s ability to repay, or in the dollar, or both.

The nation needs sound money more desperately now than ever.

Unfortunately, the debt chart above isn’t the only chart that tells a damning story. Below is a chart from TF Metals Report which shows the regular beatings given to silver in recent months. The picture for gold looks similar.

​Continue​ 
reading here: ​https://goo.gl/oG82o6

June 22 2018

moneymetals

Gerald Celente:Why You Still Need Guns, Gold, and a Getaway

Well now, without further delay, let’s get right to this week’s exclusive interview.

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Gerald Celente, publisher of the renowned Trends Journal. Mr. Celente is perhaps the most well-known trends forecaster in the world, and it's always great to have him on with us. Gerald, thanks for taking the time again today, and welcome back.

Gerald Celente: Thanks for having me on.

Mike Gleason: Well, Gerald, the potential for a trade war is the hot topic in the financial press these days. Around here, the question is what escalating concerns over trade might mean for the precious metals markets, and we would like to get your thoughts on that. But first, please give us your take on the President's trade policy in general. Some people think the U.S. has been a major beneficiary of trade. We've been able to import real goods and services in exchange for increasingly worthless dollars. Others hate what so-called globalization has done to U.S. manufacturing and think Trump is delivering a long overdue warning shot to nations who have taken advantage of the U.S. So, where do you stand on all this?

Gerald Celente: Well, we've been in the business since 1980. When NAFTA began, actually under Reagan began it trying to push through and Bush Sr., and they couldn't push through much, but Bill Clinton was the one that really brought us into NAFTA and China into the World Trade Organization. So, you just look at the numbers, and the numbers speak for themselves. Before we were in NAFTA, we had basically a neutral exchange in terms of merchandise trade deficit between Mexico and the United States. And now we have a $71 billion deficit. Who would do business like that? Would you do business with someone where you lose $71 billion a year? Then when you look at China ... and we lost by the way about 975,000 manufacturing jobs, and Clinton promised that we would gain 200,000. But I didn't have sex with that woman, Monica Lewinsky, and I smoked but I didn't inhale, so you know the guy's full of it from the beginning and to the end, and he's still a hero.

Then you look at China, what he did bringing them into the World Trade Organization. We lost about 3.5 million jobs, and we have a merchandise trade deficit with them of $375 billion a year. You can't blame Mexico or China or other countries on this. You have to, as we look at it, put the blame on the companies that went overseas to get their products made by cheap labor and then bring them back to the United States and sell them so they could gain greater profits. If you can't have an agreement with workers in your country to pay them a living wage, go to a slave labor country and get them made over there is basically what happened.

For example, 97% of the shoes and clothing that we wear are made overseas. When you go back to the 1990s, that wasn't true. It was being made over here. And then you look at the standard of living and the declines. The facts are all there. A matter of fact, we're right now, our standard of living of real personal income is below 1999 levels. Again, we don't blame anybody other than the ones that did it. China and all these other countries, Vietnam, they didn't have the technology. The Europeans and the Americans gave them the technology to do it. So, they sold us out.

So what Trump is doing with this, as we see it, this is typical Trump's Art of the Deal negotiation strategy that we point out in our Trend Alerts. You take North Korea, for example. He calls the guy Rocket Man, a moron, a maniac, and then after he meets with him, he's an honorable, great guy. The deal is done. He goes to the extremes. And that's what we believe he's doing with the tariff situation, because again, China's only buying about $130 billion worth of our goods. And they're selling us $375 billion. Are they going to kill the deal? Of course not. So, there's going to be a negotiation of this. Bottom line is, Mike, at this level, we don't see a trade war coming yet. It's not in the cards right now.

Mike Gleason: Now, when it comes to the gold and silver markets, the impact of trade policy will, we think, largely depend upon how that policy impacts the U.S. dollar. So far, the foreign exchange markets are reacting as if a potential trade war might be good for the dollar. It has been strengthening relative to other world currencies. Now, we're not so sure the markets have it right. The U.S. may run massive trade deficits on lots of products, but the one product that we export a ton of is the U.S. dollar. Anything that reduces this demand for the greenback overseas is liable to cause some problems, and the dollar is already under attack as the global reserve currency. What do you think? Will these escalating trade conflicts be good or bad for the dollar, and good or bad news for gold?


Read/Listen to the entire podcast here: 
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