Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

January 05 2018

moneymetals

Gordon Chang: Blowup w/ China or North Korea Could Change Almost Everything Overnight

Without further delay, let's get right to this week's exclusive interview. 

Gordon chang

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Gordon Chang, author, television pundit, and columnist at the Daily Beast. Gordon is a frequent guest on Fox News, CNBC, and CNN, among others, and is one of the foremost experts on Asian economics and geopolitics, having written books on the subject and it's great to have him back on with us.

Gordon, it's a real honor to have you on again, and thanks so much for your time today. I know it's been a busy week for you given all of your media appearances, and we're grateful that you could join us today. How are you?

Gordon Chang: I'm fine, thank you, and thank you so much, Mike. I really appreciate the opportunity.

Mike Gleason: Well, there are many things to cover here given all that's going on right now. We certainly appreciate your expertise, particularly when it comes to the developments in Asia. There's a lot going on in that part of the world with big implications for investors. Let's start with North Korea. That's obviously been at the forefront of the news this week with tensions getting ratcheted up again.

Kim Jong-Un and President Trump are both bragging about their nuclear arsenals. The over the top posturing on both sides makes it hard to gauge just how seriously the threat of nuclear exchange should be taken. The market seems to have stopped paying attention for the most part. Please give us your thoughts on the matter. Is there any likelihood the disagreement over North Korea's nuclear weapons program will escalate beyond words, Gordon, or is this war only going to be fought on Twitter?

Gordon Chang: If you look at Twitter, this certainly is a matter of concern, but I think the reality is much different. Right now, Kim Jong-Un, the ruler of North Korea, is feeling sanctions. We saw a hint of that in his New Year's address where he referenced it, at least indirectly, and at one point he actually called the sanctions an existential threat.

What he's trying to do right now with his overture to South Korea is to get the South Koreans to shovel money into his regime. What he would like in return for sending two figure skates to the winter Olympics in South Korea next month would be for South Korea to lift sanctions to resume inter-Korean projects, like the Kaesong Industrial Complex, and also for more North and South Korean aid.

I don't think that those expectations are realistic. Some of what he wants would be a violation of UN sanctions, and President Trump's policy has been to cut off the flow of money to Pyongyang so it can't launch missiles or detonate nukes. This is going into, I think, a very crucial period, because if you look back in history, and I'm talking seven decades, we have seen North Korea engage in military provocations shortly after making peace overtures. And this whole concept of the Olympics and his opening of dialog with South Korea, that's a peace overture.

Mike Gleason: We've got two huge wild cards at the forefront of all this with President Trump and Kim Jong-Un being rather unpredictable, to say the least. Is Trump's tit-for-tat responses to his adversary here going to make diplomacy harder to achieve as our allies might have a hard time joining in full force to combat the North Korean threat?

Listen/Read the entire podcast here: (source)

October 11 2017

moneymetals

STUNNING U.S. GOVERNMENT DEBT INCREASE IN PAST FEW DAYS... While No One Noticed


As the stock market continues to rise on the back of some of the worst geopolitical, financial, and domestic news, the U.S. Treasury has been quietly increasing the amount of government debt, with virtually no coverage by the Mainstream or Alternative Media. So, how much has the U.S. debt increased in the past few days? A bunch.

The surge in U.S. debt that took place over the past two days all started when the debt ceiling limit was officially allowed to increase on Sept 8th. In just one day, the U.S. Treasury increased the public debt by $318 billion:

Debt increase september 8, 2017

(chart courtesy of TreasuryDirect.gov)

The was the first time in U.S. history that the public debt rose over $20 trillion. I mentioned this in my article, The U.S. Government Massive ONE-DAY Debt Increase Impact On Interest Expense & Silver ETF:

The U.S. Treasury will have to pay out an additional $7 billion interest payment for the extra $318 billion in debt it increased in just one day. Again, that $7 billion interest payment is based on an average 2.2% rate multiplied by the $318 billion in debt. Now, if we compare the additional $7 billion of U.S. interest expense to the total value of the silver SLV ETF of $5.8 billion, we can plainly see that printing money, and increasing debt becomes a valuable tool for Central Banks to cap the silver price.

Thus, when the U.S. Treasury increased the public debt by $318 billion, it will also have to pay an additional $7 billion in an annual interest payment to finance that debt. However, that large one-day debt increase was over three weeks ago. What’s been going on at the U.S. Treasury since then? Let’s just say; they have been very busy… LOL.

On the last update in September, the U.S. Treasury increased the debt by nearly $40 billion on the very last day of the month:

Debt increase september 2017

(chart courtesy of TreasuryDirect.gov)

As we can see, the U.S. public debt increased from $20,203 billion ($20.203 trillion) on Sept. 28th to $20,245 billion on Sept 29th. Overall, the U.S. debt increased $83 billion more since the $318 billion one-day increase on Sept 8th. Which means, the total debt increase was $400 billion in a little more than three weeks. However, the U.S. Government must be making up for lost time when the debt ceiling was frozen from March 15th to Sept 7th.


​Continue to the full article. (Source)​

September 26 2017

moneymetals

August 15 2017

moneymetals

Rising Tensions with North Korea Prompt Safe-Haven Buying

The U.S. may somehow still find a way to get involved in a nuclear exchange with communists 26 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union – even if it’s with a backwater country whose rockets tend to explode on the launchpad. The decades-long war of words with North Korea escalated last week.

Most of us stopped paying much attention to the outlandish threats from North Korean dictators long ago. There have been plenty over the years as U.S. administrations, one after another, attempted to police the matter by applying sanctions directly and pressuring China to do the same. It is time to tune back in.

North Korea’s apparent nuclear capability, of course, makes this situation different than many of the other wars the U.S. has been waging with Third World countries. But, the stakes are getting higher generally as other major world powers have begun pushing back. Our government’s attempt to overthrow Bashar al-Assad in Syria has pitted the U.S. against Russia. Now China is threatening to engage if the U.S. attempts regime change in North Korea.

Chinese officials declared late last week that they will not tolerate a pre-emptive U.S. attack. They made the following statement via an influential state run newspaper on Thursday:

"If the U.S. and South Korea carry out strikes and try to overthrow the North Korean regime and change the political pattern of the Korean Peninsula, China will prevent them from doing so."

The Chinese have also warned North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, against attempting a first strike. No surprise, China wants to avoid a conflict in North Korea which upsets the status quo and leads to even larger U.S. presence in the region.

North korean rocket

President Trump’s rhetoric on the matter has been a match for Kim Jong-un’s in terms of hyperbole. He tweeted the U.S. military is “locked and loaded” Friday. If North Korea performs another missile test, or attempts an actual strike, the president is building the expectation he will act. That makes it harder to walk back.

Continue reading....

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl